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Today is Earth Day, a time that serves as a reminder for us all to reflect on the impact we have on our planet and how we endeavour to protect it. One such way is through the choices we make as consumers. After all, buying into a brand that prioritises sustainability means that we are too.

Today, we also saw Burberry making its latest move in sustainability and have harnessed new developments in material science for a new capsule collection. The launch of ReBurberry Edit takes off from the current Spring/Summer 2020 collection, where 26 styles have been selected to be made from the latest sustainable materials, building on the British luxury fashion house’s heritage of innovation.

Trench coats, parkas, capes and accessories make up the curated fashion offerings which are created from Econyl, a nylon regenerated from fishing nets, fabric scraps and industrial plastic. In addition, these parkas and capes are made at facilities with green programmes ranging from energy and water reduction, to textile recycling and chemical management. Other outerwear pieces are produced with a new form of nylon developed from renewable resources such as castor oil, and polyester yarn made from recycled plastic bottles.

What’s more, the ReBurberry Edit includes a range of eyewear crafted from revolutionary bio-based acetate, while a selection of bags are made in facilities that tap on renewable energy.

Despite the capsule being a new launch from Burberry, this introduction is just a cog in the wheel of their ultimate product sustainability plan. Soon, merchandise in all key product categories will be tagged with sustainability labels that inform customers of the industry-leading environmental and social credentials of the house’s holistic product-focused sustainability programme.

The new pistachio-coloured sustainability labels will explain how each product meets a range of externally-assured stringent criteria, dubbed “positive attributes”. These include the amount of organic content or recycled natural fibres used in the materials, delivery against carbon emissions standards at production facilities, or social initiatives such as workers being a paid living wage or supported through wellbeing programmes.

In addition, Burberry is proud to report that two-thirds of their products currently have more than one positive attribute, and continue to sets its sights on meeting the goal for all merchandise.

 

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